EFF to FCC: ‘Restoring Internet Freedom’ Plan Riddled With Technical Errors and Factual Inaccuracies

Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) published a post today pointing out that the FCC continues to ignore the technical parts of a letter sent to it earlier this year by nearly 200 Internet engineers and computer scientists that explained facts about the structure, history, and evolving nature of the Internet. “FCC’s latest plan to kill net neutrality is still riddled with technical errors and factual inaccuracies.” EFF has highlighted the following as examples:

— “The FCC Still Doesn’t Understand That Using the Internet Means Having Your ISP Transmit Packets For You – The biggest misunderstanding the FCC still has is the incorrect belief that when your broadband provider sells you Internet access, they’re not selling you a service by which you can transmit data to and from whatever points on the Internet you want.”

— “The FCC Still Doesn’t Understand How DNS Works – Citing back to language dating from the days of Bell Operating Companies, the FCC claims that DNS functions similarly to a gateway.”

— “The FCC Still Doesn’t Understand How Caching Works – Like DNS, it treats caching as if it were some specialized service rather than an implementation detail and general-purpose computing technique.”

— “The FCC Doesn’t Understand How the Phone System Works – The FCC’s apparent understanding of the phone system seems to be stuck in the days of rotary phones. For users on a modern American network, voice calling is just one of many applications that a phone enables. If the user has poor signal, that voice call might travel at some point over the circuit-switched PSTN, but it might also never leave a packet-switched network if it’s sent over VoIP or LTE/EPC.”

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Vinton Cerf, Co-designer of the TCP/IP Protocols & the Architecture of the Internet

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